Epidemiology

  • 8 Courses | 2h 50m 10s
  • 4 Audiobooks | 1h 58m 17s
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Learn more about the spread and global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic from Mayo Clinic, including topics such as risk factors for infection, how many are infected, where the disease is contained, and where it is currently spreading.  This collection is updated in collaboration with Mayo Clinic.

COURSES INCLUDED

Mayo Clinic Q&A: News Briefing with Dr. Poland
On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, covers the latest news on the COVID-19 pandemic. (Published 03/20/2020)
1 video | 17m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: How Contact Tracing Can Fight the Spread of COVID-19
Contact tracing is a used to slow community spread of infectious diseases like COVID-19. Contact tracing is the process of finding and reaching out to the people who have been in contact with an infected person. Then close contacts of a person who might have COVID-19 can be isolated or quarantined to lessen further spread of the virus. (Published 04/16/2020)
1 video | 15m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Ethnic Disparities and COVID-19
As COVID-19 continues to take hundreds of lives each day in the U.S., public health officials say minorities are being affected disproportionately. Early data shows that African Americans and other U.S. ethnic minorities have contracted COVID-19 at a higher rate and experience greater sickness and a higher death rate than other Americans. (Published 05/19/2020)
1 video | 13m
Mayo Clinic COVID-19: Expert Insights and Strategies - Online CME Course: Liver Tests- epidemiology
Amanda J. Chaney, APRN, D.N.P., discusses abnormal liver test function findings. (Published 10/27/2020)
1 video | 33m
Mayo Clinic COVID-19: Expert Insights and Strategies - Online CME Course: Liver Disease- epidemiology
Amanda J. Chaney, APRN, D.N.P., discusses the differences between NADFL and NASH, as well as their diagnosis, pathophysiology, and possible treatments. (Published 10/27/2020)
1 video | 25m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Viruses can’t mutate if they can’t replicate
The COVID-19 virus mutates and replicates when people let down their guard and don't follow safety protocols, such as practicing social distancing and wearing a mask. "I think most of us expect a major surge because of spring break travel and the relaxation of restrictions," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "And the sort of COVID fatigue that all of us feel, in one way or another." ( Published 03/24/2021)
1 video | 19m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: A race between vaccines, the virus and variants
COVID-19 vaccine eligibility is increasing across the U.S., as many states lower age requirements for those who can be vaccinated for COVID-19. By the end of March, the U.S. will have received 240 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine, and 173 million doses of those will have been distributed, according to Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "Our way out of this (COVID-19 pandemic) is getting a vaccine," says Dr. Poland. "But when there's misinformation and disinformation circulating about the vaccines, it scares people." Dr. Poland emphasizes the importance of relying on credible, reliable medical resources for accurate information. He also has a message for young people, who think they are too healthy to get sick with COVID-19 and that they don't need a vaccine. "Even if you don't get seriously ill, that doesn't mean you won't have long-term complications," says Dr. Poland. "It also doesn't mean that you couldn't spread it to a member of your family or somebody else." (Published 03/31/2021)
1 video | 25m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: 2020 was a record year for solid organ transplants, even amid COVID-19 pandemic
2020 was a record year for solid organ transplants, according to the Mayo Clinic Transplant Center. Despite the COVID-19pandemic, the center performed the most solid organ transplants across its three campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, than any time in history. "All donors are tested for COVID-19," says Dr. David Douglas, chair of the Mayo Clinic Transplant Center. "Anyone who had active COVID-19 would not be used as a donor. In fact, it's important to make that point because there have been no recorded cases of COVID being transmitted from the donor to a recipient from transplantation." (Published 04/01/2021)
1 video | 19m
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