Mayo Clinic Q&A

  • 99 Courses | 30h 33m 51s
  • 14 Audiobooks | 6h 1m 23s
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Mayo Clinic can help you discover how leading researchers address a broad range of COVID-19 questions that are of current interest to healthcare practitioners, as well as the general public and those responsible for their well-being.  This collection is updated in collaboration with Mayo Clinic.

COURSES INCLUDED

Mayo Clinic Q&A: News Briefing with Dr. Poland
On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, covers the latest news on the COVID-19 pandemic. (Published 03/20/2020)
1 video | 17m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: The Latest on COVID-19
On today's Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious disease expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, shares the latest information on the COVID-19 pandemic. (Published 03/24/2020)
1 video | 20m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Get Healthy, Stay Healthy Adhering to Social Distancing
As people follow recommendations to stay home and practice social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, questions arise as to how to pass the time. There may be things you can do to help get and stay healthy. (Published 03/25/2020)
1 video | 10m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Point-of-Care Manufacturing to Help Fight COVID-19
When it comes to fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, Mayo Clinic is relying not only on clinicians, but also engineers. Supply chain management and manufacturing capabilities are being readied to help in the fight against COVID-19. (Published 03/26/2020)
1 video | 10m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: How Does SARS-CoV-2 Make People Sick?
A novel coronavirus is a new strain that has not been seen before in humans. SARS-Co-V2 is a novel virus, causing the disease COVID-19. Because COVID-19 is a new disease, much is still being learned about how it spreads and the severity of illness it causes. (Published 03/31/2020)
1 video | 20m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: CDC Recommends Wearing Cloth Masks in Public
To prevent the spread of COVID-19, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recommends that Americans wear wearing cloth masks in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. The CDC considers cloth masks an additional, voluntary public health measure. (Published 04/07/2020)
1 video | 11m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Cardiac Risks of Off-Label Drugs to Treat COVID-19
A study published recently in Mayo Clinic Proceedings details information about potential cardiac side effects when using off-label drugs to treat COVID-19. Off-label means the drug has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat a different condition. Some of the off-label drugs being used to treat COVID-19 have a risk of sudden cardiac arrest and death. (Published 04/08/2020)
1 video | 15m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Pregnancy During the COVID-19 Pandemic
COVID-19 is the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Because SARS-CoV-2 is a novel coronavirus, researchers are still learning how the virus affects the body. And this raises questions for pregnant women. Can COVID-19 affect pregnancy? Is breastfeeding safe? How can a pregnant woman protect herself from the disease? (Published 04/10/2020)
1 video | 10m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Emergency Medicine in the Time of COVID-19
Emergency medicine is a specialty that prides itself on a mantra: anyone, anything, anytime. The COVID-19 pandemic has put emergency health care providers and first responders on the front lines, fighting the spread of the virus and caring for critically ill patients. (Published 04/13/2020)
1 video | 17m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Critical Care Units Prepare for COVID-19
An intensive care unit (ICU) is a special unit in a hospital where patients who are very ill can be under constant supervision by their health care team. The COVID-19 pandemic has stressed ICU and critical care units in hot spots where the virus had spread widely. (Published 04/15/2020)
1 video | 11m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: How Contact Tracing Can Fight the Spread of COVID-19
Contact tracing is a used to slow community spread of infectious diseases like COVID-19. Contact tracing is the process of finding and reaching out to the people who have been in contact with an infected person. Then close contacts of a person who might have COVID-19 can be isolated or quarantined to lessen further spread of the virus. (Published 04/16/2020)
1 video | 15m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Managing Stress and Anxiety During COVID-19 Pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has forced changes to daily life, and disrupted normal routines at work, at school, and at home. Physical isolation can negatively affect mental health, and constant news coverage can bring fear and anxiety about the disease. How can you best cope in these uncertain times? (Published 04/17/2020)
1 video | 20m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Mayo Clinic Laboratories Launches Serology Testing
A new serology test from Mayo Clinic Laboratories is being used to identify the presence of immune response to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The serology test is intended only to detect antibodies to the virus. It does not diagnose recent or active infection. Mayo Clinic Laboratories also offers a molecular test to diagnose very recent or active infection. Both tests are important tools in the pandemic response. (Published 04/20/2020)
1 video | 10m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Inside Mayo Clinic's COVID-19 Research Task Force
As the SARS-CoV-2 virus spread worldwide, a race began to develop testing protocols and ramp up research. Mayo Clinic's COVID-19 research task force is studying the virus, predicting hot spots, and working towards effective treatments and a vaccine. (Published 04/21/2020)
1 video | 14m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Abuse at Home-Safety Planning During COVID-19
People around the world have been under stay-at-home orders to prevent the spread of coronavirus. While this situation isn't ideal, it can be dangerous for some. For people in abusive situations, the home may not be a safe environment. (Published 04/23/2020)
1 video | 10m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Skin Care for Your Hands, Face During COVID-19
Your best defense against the spread of coronavirus is hand-washing, but frequent hand-washing can deplete the skin of its natural moisture and oils, causing dry and cracked skin. Recommendations to wear face masks also are taking a toll on the skin. Face masks may rub across the nose and behind the ears, which can irritate the skin. What should you do if your skin is becoming dry or sensitive? (Published 04/24/2020)
1 video | 19m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Using Tele-ICU to Support New York Hospital
Using tele-ICU capabilities, Mayo Clinic physicians in critical care medicine are volunteering to support staff at New York-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital, which has been inundated with COVID-19 cases. At this unprecedented time, these two organizations are collaborating and innovating to help patients. (Published 04/27/2020)
1 video | 11m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Respiratory Therapists Play Critical Role in Treating COVID-19 Patients
COVID-19 was first identified late last year with a cluster of pneumonia cases caused by a new coronavirus. The COVID-19 disease process heavily affects the respiratory system, and patients often need oxygen support. The respiratory therapist plays a critical role in managing oxygen levels, placing breathing tubes, and managing the mechanical ventilator, when necessary. (Published 04/28/2020)
1 video | 16m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Questions Answered
Each week, the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast shares the latest information on the COVID-19 pandemic. (Published 04/29/2020)
1 video | 12m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Maintaining Routine Vaccine Schedules During COVID-19
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, the World Health Organization(WHO) says more than 117 million children in 37 countries may be missing out on the lifesaving measles vaccine. The WHO had issued some guidelines to help countries sustain immunization activities during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Published 05/01/2020)
1 video | 12m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Cancer Treatment During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Because cancer treatments can weaken the immune system, cancer patients are at increased risk of complications from COVID-19. Despite these concerns, cancer patients often still need treatment, including going to the clinic or to the hospital, and many have questions about whether cancer should be treated differently during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Published 05/04/2020)
1 video | 14m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Possible Neurological Effects of COVID-19
Originally identified as a respiratory disease, some COVID-19 patients exhibit neurologic symptoms including stroke, loss of consciousness, headache, and even the loss of taste and smell. What's unknown is whether these are direct effects of the virus entering the nervous system, or consequences of the disease's effect on the body. (Published 05/06/2020)
1 video | 13m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: The "Quarantine 15"
It’s being called the "Quarantine 15" online — people poking fun at gaining weight while staying at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. Is it really a problem? Or does eating help cope with stress? And what about for kids? Public health researchers warn that COVID-19 related school closures will double out-of-school time this year, raising concerns about weight gain associated with summer recess for children. (Published 05/07/2020)
1 video | 10m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: How to Clean During COVID-19
Spring has sprung, and, for many, spring cleaning is a ritual. During the COVID-19 pandemic, cleaning and disinfecting homes is more important than ever. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new cleaning guidelines to help effectively fight COVID-19 as businesses, schools and public spaces reopen. (Published 05/11/2020)
1 video | 15m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 New Briefing
On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, covers the latest news on the COVID-19 pandemic. (Published 05/12/2020)
1 video | 22m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Research at Mayo Clinic
Thanks to its combination of practice, education, and research, Mayo Clinic has a strong foundation to respond quickly to a medical crisis such as COVID-19. As the SARS-CoV-2 virus spread worldwide, a research task force was formed at Mayo Clinic to review and approve research proposals related to the virus and the disease it causes. (Published 05/12/2020)
1 video | 16m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Mayo Clinic Expands In-Person Care
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals and clinics were forced to postpone nonessential appointments and surgeries in March and April. Thanks to social distancing and executive stay-at-home orders which helped flatten the curve of the COVID-19 outbreak, Mayo Clinic is prepared now, not only to meet the projected needs of COVID-19 patients, but safely treat patients whose care was delayed, and to welcome new patients as well. (Published 05/13/2020)
1 video | 25m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Surgical Practice During COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic forced elective surgeries to be delayed while hospitals prepared for the potential influx of COVID-19 patients. Thanks to effective efforts to flatten the curve and the lifting of executive stay-at-home orders, Mayo Clinic is again able to see patients for elective surgeries. What’s different for patients when having surgery during the coronavirus era? And what extra steps is Mayo Clinic taking to keep patients and staff safe? (Published 05/14/2020)
1 video | 11m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Ethnic Disparities and COVID-19
As COVID-19 continues to take hundreds of lives each day in the U.S., public health officials say minorities are being affected disproportionately. Early data shows that African Americans and other U.S. ethnic minorities have contracted COVID-19 at a higher rate and experience greater sickness and a higher death rate than other Americans. (Published 05/19/2020)
1 video | 13m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Update
On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, covers the latest news on the COVID-19 pandemic. (Published 05/20/2020)
1 video | 16m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Convalescent Plasma Therapy
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Government is supporting a national Expanded Access Program to collect and provide convalescent plasma to patients in need across the country (uscovidplasma.org). Convalescent plasma refers to blood plasma collected from people who have recovered from COVID-19. That plasma, which contains antibodies against the virus, is then used to treat others with advanced illness. Working collaboratively with industry, academic and government partners, Mayo Clinic is serving as the lead institution for the program. (Published 05/21/2020)
1 video | 11m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Understanding COVID-19 Testing
Mayo Clinic has been a leader in developing and deploying testing for COVID-19, but understanding the different types of tests and what they measure can be confusing. Terms like viral, molecular, serology and antibodies aren’t clear for everyone. What are the different COVID-19 tests, and what do they do? (Published 05/22/2020)
1 video | 11m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: What we know about virus transmission
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the most common mode of transmission for COVID-19 is through close contact from person to person. While it is possible that someone can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose or possibly their eyes, this isn’t thought to be the main way the virus spreads. (Published 05/27/2020)
1 video | 28m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Expedited breast cancer treatment June 2, 2020
During the COVID-19 pandemic, one thing that hasn’t stopped is the need for cancer treatment. While patients might be hesitant to leave their homes for weeks at a time for treatment, there is a fast-track treatment option at Mayo Clinic for some breast cancer patients. Certain low-risk breast cancer patients can now complete their surgery and radiation in less than 10 days.
1 video | 8m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Medical Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Across the world, one of the biggest changes forced by the COVID-19 pandemic is in the field of education. Programs from kindergarten through postsecondary have rapidly moved to a distance learning model. (Published 06/10/2020)
1 video | 12m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 update with Dr. Greg Poland
Dr. Poland gives an update on progress towards a vaccine for COVID-19, discusses therapies for treating the virus and shares research on how effective face masks and physical distancing are in fighting the spread of the disease. (Published 07/24/2020)
1 video | 27m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Telemedicine in the Emergency Department
During the COVID-pandemic, we've heard a lot about telemedicine. While still a relatively new concept, advances in technology have made telemedicine a reality in hospitals, clinics, even the E-R. (Published 07/22/2020)
1 video | 9m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Herd Immunity, Antibodies and COVID-19
The concept of herd immunity has sparked debate about whether it would control the spread of COVID-19. (Published 07/31/2020)
1 video | 17m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Will there be an At-Home Test for COVID-19?
Recently, the Food and Drug Administration paved the way for commercial developers to create at-home COVID-19 tests. While no test is yet approved for home use, a fast and cheap test could encourage people to test themselves routinely before going to work or school. Real-time results would enable infected people to self-quarantine right away, keeping asymptomatic people from infecting others. "It fits with the modeling that’s been done where if you can test frequently enough that you could actually start to dampen down, if people would quarantine, you could dampen down cases. And that, as you know, would be huge," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group. (Published 08/07/2020)
1 video | 21m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: #AskTheMayoMom about COVID-19, School Children
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to create challenges, including returning to school with hybrid learning modules for children. There are also anxieties and uncertainties to navigate while trying to follow COVID-19 guidelines. (Published 9/18/2020)
1 video | 17m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: How Flu Vaccines Can Help in COVID-19 Fight
With fall approaching and winter just around the corner, many are wondering how COVID-19 will affect this flu season. Some experts warn of a “twindemic,” with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the onset of influenza overlapping here in the Northern Hemisphere. To keep people healthy and not overload the health care system, experts say getting a flu vaccine this year is more important than ever. (Published 9/23/2020)
1 video | 14m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Time for your Flu Vaccine
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, it’s more important than ever to get a flu vaccine this year to keep people healthy and not overload the health care system. While a flu vaccine won't protect against COVID-19, flu vaccines will reduce your risk of flu illness, hospitalization and death. "You need to get the flu vaccine at least two weeks prior to the onset of flu activity in your region," says Dr. Priya Sampathkumar, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. (Published 9/25/2020)
1 video | 6m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Mayo Clinic Platform Aims to Create New Care Delivery Possibilities
The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the use of digital health care, with telemedicine playing a big role in treating patients during the pandemic. But telemedicine appointments are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to changing the way health care will be delivered in the future. Mayo Clinic Platform is a collection of initiatives focused on transforming health care by using technology, big data and artificial intelligence to make connections. (Published 9/28/2020)
1 video | 10m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Transplant Surgeries and COVID-19
Transplants are identified as nonelective surgeries, and transplant patients have faced urgent medical needs during the COVID-19 pandemic. "Our practice, like many others across the country, did slow down in March and April of this year," says Dr. Patrick Dean, a Mayo Clinic transplant surgeon. "Patients and providers were concerned ― appropriately so ― about what would happen with this pandemic and whether it would be safe to have a transplant or for that matter any health care that wasn't absolutely emergent." (Published 9/29/2020)
1 video | 11m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID Fatigue Fueling a Rise in Cases
With the COVID-19 pandemic entering a tenth month, experts says adherence to public health measures appears to be waning in some parts of the country. "COVID fatigue," meaning failing to comply with masking, hand hygiene and physical distancing guidelines, has fueled a resurgence in COVID-19 cases in more than half of the U.S. states. (Published 9/30/2020)
1 video | 19m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Different options for breast cancer screening
During the COVID-19 pandemic, women have reportedly skipped or delayed their regular breast cancer screenings. This may lead to a surge in breast cancer diagnoses in the months ahead. That's according to a study in JAMA. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Dr. Katie Hunt, a Mayo Clinic radiologist, says it's the perfect time to make sure women are up to date on their breast cancer screenings. (Published 10/01/2020)
1 video | 12m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Remote Monitoring of COVID-19 Patients
When patients are diagnosed with COVID-19, they are required to self-isolate until the infection is cleared. Some patients will be at risk for complications, and may need comprehensive support at home. Providing that support is the goal of Mayo Clinic's remote patient monitoring team. (Published 10/05/2020)
1 video | 16m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Managing COVID-19 Inpatients
While most people who contract COVID-19 will be able to manage symptoms and recover at home, there are some who have a more severe course of the disease and need to be hospitalized. Physicians and scientists have learned a lot about COVID-19 in the first nine months of the pandemic, and that new knowledge is improving treatments for patients hospitalized with COVID-19. (Published 10/06/2020)
1 video | 15m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: How do Antiviral Drugs Work?
Antiviral drugs are medicines that fight against viruses in your body by impeding the infection process. Antivirals are commonly used to treat HIV/AIDS, influenza, herpes, and hepatitis B and C. The antiviral, Remdesivir, which was originally developed to fight Ebola, is now being used to treat COVID-19. (Published 10/07/2020) 
1 video | 18m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Stay Up To Date on Routine Vaccinations
Pediatricians and family physicians are alerting parents that it’s important to keep their children up to date on routine vaccinations, whether or not children attend in-person school. "We’ve had a number of difficulties with the COVID-19 pandemic that actually resulted in children missing months of well-child visits in which routine vaccines were given," says Dr. Robert Jacobson, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician. (Published 10/08/2020)
1 video | 13m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Increased Alcohol Use During the Pandemic
According to an article in the journal JAMA Network Open, American adults report they are drinking 14% more often during the COVID-19 pandemic. While the research didn't determine why drinking frequency has increased, health experts worry that people are turning to alcohol to cope with the stress, anxiety, and isolation caused by the pandemic. (Published 10/12/2020)
1 video | 17m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: FDA Sets Stricter Standards for COVID-19 Vaccine Development
In an effort to reassure the public about the safety and effectiveness of a vaccine, the Food and Drug Administration has set stricter standards for COVID-19 vaccine development. These standards include following phase 3 clinical trial participants for at least two months, and having at least five severe COVID-19 cases in the placebo group. The agency's requirements are designed to ensure that there is adequate safety data on any vaccine before it is authorized for emergency use. (Published 10/14/2020)
1 video | 18m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Lung Damage Could Lead to Transplant
Severe lung damage has been a serious outcome for COVID-19 patients who survive and face recovery from the disease. "As we know, lungs are one of the major organs that are involved with COVID infection," says Dr. Sadia Shah, a Mayo Clinic transplant pulmonologist and critical care physician. "In severe cases, the patient's lungs can be significantly inflamed from the disease, leading to pneumonia and scarring of the lungs, also known as pulmonary fibrosis." She says that, in the future, these are the patients who may need a lung transplant. (Published 10/16/2020)
1 video | 9m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Activity Rehabilitation Program
After COVID-19 patients have recovered from the infection, some continue to have lingering effects from the disease, known as post-COVID syndrome. To help these patients, Mayo Clinic has launched the COVID-19 Activity Rehabilitation Program. This program takes a multidisciplinary approach, including specialists in occupational medicine, pulmonary medicine, psychiatry and infectious diseases to treat persistent symptoms and help patients return to daily activities and work. (Published 10/17/2020)
1 video | 15m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: US Coronavirus Map - What do the Trends Mean to You?
As cases of COVID-19 rise in many areas of the U.S., it's important for people to have up-to-date information to protect themselves and their loved ones. Mayo Clinic has a tracking tool that features the latest COVID-19 data for every county in all 50 states, and Washington, D.C. The tool also features Mayo Clinic's insight on how to assess risk and plan accordingly. (Published 10/19/2020)
1 video | 8m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Trials Pause Over Safety Concerns
The race to COVID-19 vaccines and treatments continues, with multiple clinical trials now in the final stages of testing. While the research is moving rapidly, it’s not without challenges. Two different trials were paused recently over potential safety concerns. (Published 10/21/2020)
1 video | 16m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Resiliency During COVID-19 Pandemic Flu Season
As the COVID pandemic continues and flu season begins, staying healthy and finding ways to improve your immunity is important. "A resilient immune system is not just preventing, but constantly eliminating our exposures to background infections or inflammatory agents," says Dr. Anjali Bhagra, a Mayo Clinic integrative medicine specialist. "It allows your body to keep healing from inflammatory or infective triggers." (Published 10/22/2020)
1 video | 18m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: CDC Updates Close Contact Guidelines
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated its guidelines for defining close contact with a person who is positive for COVID-19. Previously, close contact was defined as occurring when someone was within 6 feet of an infectious person for 15 consecutive minutes. Now close contact includes people who were within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes over a 24-hour period, as the CDC now advises that repeated, brief encounters also carry a risk of transmission. (Published 10/28/2020)
1 video | 21m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Digital Tools Help Mayo Clinic with Contact Tracing
As positive cases of COVID-19 continue to spike across much of the country, the role of contact tracing to prevent further spread becomes more important. Contact tracing is the process of notifying people who have had close contact with people newly infected with COVID-19, to let them know they may have been exposed. When it comes to contact tracing, quarantining and isolation, timing is critical to prevent further infections. (Published 10/29/2020)
1 video | 10m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Health Disparity and Effects of COVID-19 on Racial, Ethnic Minorities
A recent Mayo Clinic study looked at the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on racial and ethnic minorities. "We found that environmental factors, especially systemic racism and problems with housing density, predispose these patients to have more chances of infection," says Dr. Aditya Shah, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases expert and one of the authors of the study. (Published 10/30/2020)
1 video | 12m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Listener Mailbag on COVID-19
Each week, the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast shares the latest information on COVID-19. On today's episode, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious disease expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, answers listeners' coronavirus questions. (Published 11/02/2020)
1 video | 21m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Mental Health and Coping During the Pandemic
A recent survey conducted on behalf of the American Psychological Association found that nearly 80% of adults say that the coronavirus pandemic is a significant source of stress in their lives. In addition, 60% say that they are overwhelmed by the number of issues America faces, including health care, the economy, racism and political tensions. Now, the holidays are looming, a time of year that often brings heightened family and relationship stress. How can we better cope in these unsettling times? (Published 11/04/2020)
1 video | 28m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: US Tops 10 Million Cases of COVID-19
The U.S. reached the wrong kind of milestones this past week, reporting the 10 millionth coronavirus case and daily infection rates repeatedly topping the 100,000 mark. Cases of COVID-19 have been spiking for weeks as a third wave of infections spreads across the country. (Published 11/11/2020)
1 video | 15m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Fighting COVID-19 with Mayo Clinic Laboratories
When the COVID-19 pandemic began, one of the areas of science and research most affected was laboratory medicine. From developing tests that detect the virus, to testing for antibodies in patients who have recovered, Mayo Clinic Laboratories has been at the forefront of COVID-19 testing and research. (Published 11/12/2020)
1 video | 16m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Cardiometabolic Diseases Increase COVID-19 Risk
An estimated 47 million Americans are living with cardiometabolic diseases, according to the American College of Cardiology. Cardiometabolic diseases are interrelated conditions that include cardiovascular diseases, such as heart disease, stroke, and hypertension, as well as metabolic diseases, such as Type 2 diabetes, obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Patients with cardiometabolic diseases have a higher risk of not only developing COVID-19, but also developing complications related to COVID-19. (Published 11/13/2020)
1 video | 11m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Addressing Disparities to Prevent Disease
Several communities and populations are underserved by the U.S. health care system. There are many reasons for this, including differences in risk incidence, morbidity and mortality due to social, economic and structural factors. And the COVID-19 pandemic has further exposed these health care inequities. "The term health care equity actually implies justice and fairness, as well as intentional action," says Dr. Chyke Doubeni, director of Mayo Clinic's Center for Health Equity and Community Engagement Research. "So, as a matter of fact, inequities stem from injustices and failures to act. As a society, we have to address this. These are things that are fixable." (Published 12/22/2020)
1 video | 21m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Vaccinations Happening in Phases
Front-line health care workers across the country are receiving the first COVID-19 vaccinations. With the recent approval of a second COVID-19 vaccine for use here in the U.S., more COVID-19 vaccine doses are expected to be available this week. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention panel has recommended allocating COVID-19 vaccines for the next phase. Phase 1b includes those who are 75 and older as well as front-line essential workers, including police, firefighters, teachers and grocery store workers. These vaccinations would begin when phase 1a, health care workers and long term care residents, is completed. (Published 12/23/2020)
1 video | 23m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Coping with Relationship Stress During the COVID-19 Pandemic
The holiday season can be stressful all on its own, but add the COVID-19 pandemic and you have the potential for increased anxiety. With health concerns and potential financial worries, coupled with being inside for the winter, some relationships might be feeling the tension of too much togetherness. "At the beginning of the pandemic, I was hearing a lot from couples that I work with, about how much they were appreciating the ability to spend more time together," says Dr. Jennifer Vencill, a Mayo Clinic psychologist. "But that story is starting to shift a little." (Published 12/28/2020)
1 video | 14m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Mortality Study Shows Effectiveness of Team-Based Care
A recent Mayo Clinic study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that patients with COVID-19 who received care at Mayo Clinic had lower mortality rates than the national average. Mayo Clinic patients were treated using an integrated, team-based approach for patient monitoring and treatment. (Published 12/29/2020)
1 video | 20m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Weekly Update
2020 has been a year consumed by COVID-19, from the first news of the virus in the U.S. in January to vaccines rolling out in December. Scientists, health care providers and the public have gained new knowledge and understanding of infectious diseases and virus transmission, and COVID-19 vaccines were developed in record time. (Published 12/30/2020)
1 video | 21m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Opioid Crisis Worsens During COVID-19 Pandemic
Stress, isolation and limited access to resources are fueling rising rates of substance abuse and overdoses during the COVID-19 pandemic. While coronavirus has been the focus of so much attention this year, the opioid crisis has continued unabated and has even worsened. More than 40 states have reported increases in opioid-related deaths, according to the American Medical Association. (Published 01/01/2021)
1 video | 27m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Healthier Eating to Kick-Start the New Year
As the new year kicks off, many people renew or begin a commitment to improving their health. Often, that starts with healthy eating, and this year it might include kicking bad habits developed during the COVID-19 pandemic. On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Katherine Zeratsky, a registered dietitian nutritionist at Mayo Clinic, offers nutrition tips and suggests small changes that can lead to better eating habits and help you shift to healthier eating in 2021. (Published 01/04/2021)
1 video | 20m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Looking Back and Moving Forward with Patient Care During COVID-19
Battling the COVID-19 pandemic continues to be challenging, especially for health care workers across all levels of patient care. "People came together in adversity, responded and synergized to create a situation where we not only survived but thrived within this challenging environment," says Dr. Conor Loftus, chair of Mayo Clinic outpatient practice. (Published 01/06/2020)
1 video | 25m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Expert updates on COVID-19 vaccines
The U.S. rollout of COVID-19 vaccines is reportedly ramping up with the news that nearly all available doses will soon be released to the American public. "The new COVID-19 variants are traveling quickly, and this is a warning that we need to take precautions," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. Dr. Poland says these new variants are a consequence of an RNA virus being transmitted from human to human. "Even after we get our vaccines, we still need to wear masks out in public. We still need to maintain physical distancing. And we still need to wash our hands until about 80% of people get their COVID-19 vaccines," Dr. Poland emphasizes. (Published 01/13/2021)
1 video | 30m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19, vaccines and children
The distribution kinks for COVID-19 vaccines are getting ironed out, says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group."It's a logistics nightmare, but now you're seeing a plan to administer 1 million doses a day and I think that's very achievable," says Dr. Poland. "And the production of the vaccine is just going to accelerate." Dr. Poland also repeats the reminders about preventing transmission of COVID-19: Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Keep your social distance. "The current estimates are that in the next four weeks, we'll probably have about another 100,000 deaths," adds Dr. Poland. "It's stunning when you think about 1 out of every 860 Americans has now died of this." (Published 01/20/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 pandemic's mental health toll
Fear and worry are normal responses when people perceive and experience threats. The COVID-19 pandemic has brought daily stressors over the past year, leaving many people with a sustained feeling of anxiety. While social distancing has been necessary to reduce the spread of COVID-19, the separation from others can exacerbate anxiety by leaving people feeling isolated and lonely. Learning to recognize and cope with stress in healthy ways can improve resilience. (Published 01/27/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: Emergency medicine and managing the COVID-19 pandemic
It's been a year since the first case of COVID-19 was diagnosed in the U.S. Since then the U.S. has seen more than 25 million cases of COVID-19 and more than 400,00 deaths. This has taken a significant emotional toll on the nation. COVID-19 is a disease that affects the entire health care system, and emergency medical teams are often on the front lines receiving infected patients. The challenges have been numerous as symptoms varied, screening protocols changed, and lifesaving treatments have been developed. (Published 02/01/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 virus, variants and vaccines update
When it comes to the COVID-19 pandemic, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, says there's some good news. "Case numbers are falling, masking and distancing do work, and we can control this if we do it right." However, the not so good news is that variants are showing up in over 30 countries and are reportedly more transmissible. There also seems to be a reduction in vaccine efficacy against the new variants. "This is a desperate race between vaccine and virus, between time and opportunity, and we dare not lose that opportunity," emphasizes Dr. Poland. (Published 02/03/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: Cure, Connect and Transform Health Care Around the World
Mayo Clinic International is taking health care to the world in new ways. Expanding abroad through virtual, hybrid and on-the-ground patient care. "I think we have a moral obligation to take the Mayo model of care to the world, particularly as it pertains to serious and complex diseases," says Dr. Anton Decker, president of Mayo Clinic International. (Published 02/08/2021)
1 video | 29m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Answering Questions about COVID-19 Vaccines
As new COVID-19 variants spread and more people are vaccinated for COVID-19, people have more questions about COVID-19 vaccines. Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, says that's understandable with new information released every day. For instance, people are wondering what type of medications they can take if they're being vaccinated for COVID-19. There are also concerns about whether a person who has been vaccinated for COVID-19 can transmit the virus. And some are asking why they need to wait 14 days, before and after being vaccinated for COVID-19, if they are scheduled to be given a different vaccine, such as a shingles vaccine. (Published 02/10/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: Tackling the Latest COVID-19 Topics
Medical research reveals new information about COVID-19 daily. While scientists and medical experts focus on virus spread, new variants, improved therapeutic treatments and more, it's sometimes difficult for the public to keep up with evolving information. (Published 02/17/2021)
1 video | 36m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Variants and the Evolving Science
People may be curious, confused or critical of what seem to be changing messages related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, reminds folks that messages change because data changes and the science evolves. "As we learn new science, we use that science to modify our recommendations," says Dr. Poland. "It's not that scientists are flip-flopping. It is that new data allows us to begin expanding those recommendations." For instance, COVID-19 cases and deaths in the U.S. are currently declining. But, Dr. Poland says, there are new data predicting the possibility of another surge of COVID-19 infections in March because of U.K. variant transmission. (Published 02/24/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: Don't Delay Lifesaving Cancer Tests, Treatments Because of COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic has changed, canceled and delayed many parts of people's lives, including when or if they seek medical care. Dr. Robert McWilliams, a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist, says there are various reasons patients may be avoiding or delaying care. But he emphasizes that coming to medical institutions is safe, and that ignoring symptoms or delaying exams can result in more severe illness or even death. "Early on in the pandemic, we said to postpone elective care," says Dr. McWilliams. "Unfortunately, I think a lot of people view cancer screening as part of elective care. It's really not." (Published 03/02/2021)
1 video | 19m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Don't Let Down Your Guard During the COVID-19 Pandemic
"People seem to be decreasing travel. More folks are wearing masks. They're following that hand, space, and vaccinate paradigm," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "And it's working." But he warns that this is not the time to let down your guard during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Poland says there are three COVID-19 vaccines and receiving whichever one is available to you, is the way out of this pandemic. He also reminds people to continue wearing masks, even after being vaccinated for COVID-19. (Published 03/03/2021)
1 video | 34m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: Innovation During COVID-19 Improves Patient Care for the Future
At Mayo Clinic in Arizona, the COVID-19 pandemic means expanding virtual capabilities, increasing innovation, communicating and coordinating even more than usual, and streamlining patient care. Dr. Richard Gray, CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona, says the medical teams and staff continue to be nimble and flexible, and they are learning each step of the way. "I think that all of the creative solutions and accelerations in health care transformation will be what we'll carry with us," says Dr. Gray. "Because those will still be a day-to-day part of how we're taking care of patients and how we're performing our research and education duties." Dr. Gray adds, "It's validated a lot of our thoughts of what the future should look like for Mayo Clinic and in a patient-centered way." (Published 03/05/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: “Brain fog” is a lingering condition for many COVID-19 long-haulers
Fatigue and what's being called "brain fog" are turning out to be some of the most common issues for long-hauler patients recovering from COVID-19. The National Institutes of Health calls these and other symptoms, which can last for several months, post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2, or PASC. Those suffering from brain fog may experience short-term memory loss, confusion, difficulty concentrating or just feeling different than they did before they had COVID-19, even if it was a mild case of the infection. And Dr. Billie Schultz, a Mayo Clinic physical medicine and rehabilitation expert, says, though older patients have these symptoms more often, younger people are also showing up with brain fog. (Published 03/08/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: So much learned in 1 year of COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed how quickly life can change. That's evident in people's personal lives and across the scientific community. Remarkable advances have been made in science over the past year, guided by international research collaborations. "When you look at nine months from when we first identified this pathogen to having a vaccine, that's as close to a human miracle, if I could use that term, as as one could expect," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. But he says there have been some frustrations. "As soon as we make some progress, everybody wants to open up and relax restrictions," says Dr. Poland. "Opening up and getting back to normal is not a light switch." (Published 03/10/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: Rapid pace of COVID-19 vaccinations
Millions of people in the U.S. are being vaccinated for COVID-19. However, the discussion is ongoing as to whether people who are immunocompromised, such as patients undergoing cancer treatment, or people who have autoimmune diseases, should be vaccinated for COVID-19. "Both of those categories (of people) should be vaccinated," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "Those are not contraindications. Those are indications to get the vaccine." He adds that research is ongoing, but current information demonstrates the benefits far outweigh the theoretical risks. (Published 03/17/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: Protection protocols involving ear, nose and throat patients during COVID-19
The COVID-19 virus spreads through respiratory droplets. This means treating patients who have diseases or injuries involving the ears, nose or throat, or the head and neck require particular precautions. "COVID-19 taught us all to be more nimble," says Dr. Devyani Lal, a Mayo Clinic otolaryngologist and head and neck surgeon. She says the COVID-19 pandemic required Mayo Clinic's Department of Otolaryngology to pivot quickly and require that patients be tested for COVID-19 before appointments. (Published 03/19/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: Viruses can’t mutate if they can’t replicate
The COVID-19 virus mutates and replicates when people let down their guard and don't follow safety protocols, such as practicing social distancing and wearing a mask. "I think most of us expect a major surge because of spring break travel and the relaxation of restrictions," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "And the sort of COVID fatigue that all of us feel, in one way or another." ( Published 03/24/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: A race between vaccines, the virus and variants
COVID-19 vaccine eligibility is increasing across the U.S., as many states lower age requirements for those who can be vaccinated for COVID-19. By the end of March, the U.S. will have received 240 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine, and 173 million doses of those will have been distributed, according to Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "Our way out of this (COVID-19 pandemic) is getting a vaccine," says Dr. Poland. "But when there's misinformation and disinformation circulating about the vaccines, it scares people." Dr. Poland emphasizes the importance of relying on credible, reliable medical resources for accurate information. He also has a message for young people, who think they are too healthy to get sick with COVID-19 and that they don't need a vaccine. "Even if you don't get seriously ill, that doesn't mean you won't have long-term complications," says Dr. Poland. "It also doesn't mean that you couldn't spread it to a member of your family or somebody else." (Published 03/31/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: 2020 was a record year for solid organ transplants, even amid COVID-19 pandemic
2020 was a record year for solid organ transplants, according to the Mayo Clinic Transplant Center. Despite the COVID-19pandemic, the center performed the most solid organ transplants across its three campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, than any time in history. "All donors are tested for COVID-19," says Dr. David Douglas, chair of the Mayo Clinic Transplant Center. "Anyone who had active COVID-19 would not be used as a donor. In fact, it's important to make that point because there have been no recorded cases of COVID being transmitted from the donor to a recipient from transplantation." (Published 04/01/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: Vacation travel, vaccines for teens and more COVID-19 news
If you're fully vaccinated for COVID-19 you can travel domestically and where travel is allowed internationally, according to new interim travel guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Even with those recommendations the CDC continues to recommend not traveling unless it is essential. Regardless, the CDC strongly recommends people continue to wear a face mask, practice social distancing and sanitize their hands. Meanwhile, COVID-19 vaccine research is continuing in teenagers. "The early data show equal safety in young people age 12 to 16," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "I think this is going to imply that, somewhere between this fall and Christmas, we're going to be able to offer the (COVID-19) vaccine to every age group." (Published 04/07/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: Mayo’s bold changes, moving forward through the COVID-19 pandemic
In the midst of the COVID-19 global health crisis, Mayo Clinic is changing the way patient care is provided. "I think, as an organization, we've made close to a decade of progress over the course of one year," says Mayo Clinic President and CEO Dr. Gianrico Farrugia. "The COVID-19 pandemic pushed us faster and further than we could have imagined. We're now tangibly stronger than we were pre-COVID — in our practice, in education, in research and in operation and business agility." One example, says Dr. Farrugia, has been with virtual and digital care. "We all want to see our patients in person," explains Dr. Farrugia. "But the other side of the coin is that it's important to meet patients where they are, to make health care easier for their daily lives. What we're seeing now is that we can do both physical and virtual care really well and do it seamlessly." (Published 04/12/2021)
1 video | 27m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: On the verge of another COVID-19 surge
As spring break travelers return home and the highly transmissible U.K. COVID-19 variant is discovered in all 50 U.S. states, the country is on the verge of a fourth COVID-19 pandemic surge. That's according to a number of health experts, including Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. However, Dr. Poland says there is some good news related to the transmission of COVID-19 on surfaces. "Wisdom resides in changing your mind and your recommendations as new data and science become available," says Dr. Poland. "What the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is doing is modifying those guidelines, saying that the risk of touching a contaminated surface and then getting infected is very low." (Published 04/14/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: Don’t miss a beat with preventive heart care
For many people, the COVID-19 pandemic has provided an opportunity to reassess priorities in their lives, spend more time with loved ones, and take care of some projects or personal issues that they’ve been avoiding. But some people may have been avoiding their heart health. Dr. Christopher DeSimone, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, says he's concerned some patients may have been ignoring symptoms, waiting six or nine months, or even a year, before going to in for a medical exam. "What's really heartbreaking is there are things we could have offered patients — medicines and interventions — things that we could have caught in an earlier time frame," says Dr. DeSimone. "We could have really impacted their quality of life and lessened their risk from dying of heart disease." (Published 04/16/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: Mayo Clinic Laboratories delivers during COVID-19
Mayo Clinic Laboratories has performed over 3 million COVID-19 tests. "In December 2019, there was a disease, and three months later, everyone in the country — and around the globe — wanted a test to see if they had the disease," says Dr. William Morice II, president of Mayo Clinic Laboratories. "With COVID-19, we've learned the importance of laboratory testing and diagnostic medicine in health care, both in the U.S. and globally." Dr. Morice says professionals are needed in laboratory medicine, who understand the technology and science but also who understand the human need. "One of the strong memories for me was being in the lab late at night, and getting an email from a Native American tribal leader saying, 'We need help,'" says Dr. Morice. (Published 04/20/2021)
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Mayo Clinic Q&A: Breakthrough COVID-19 infections and booster vaccines
Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group says COVID-19mutations and the virus spread are happening because of people who don't wear masks, who don't get vaccinated and who don't adhere to safety recommendations. "I believe that we should be radically transparent and honest," says Dr. Poland. "The more time this virus passes through one person after another, the more likely it continues to mutate. As a result of those mutations, two things are happening. Some of the mutations are making vaccines and plasma monoclonal antibodies less effective. The other thing is that the virus will likely become something that we have to live with for the rest of our lives." Dr. Poland reminds people that vaccine protection is not 100%. Breakthrough infections can occur. "Remember that in the clinical trials, 95% means that compared to unvaccinated people, your risk is reduced by 95% — not 100%," he says. "You might have a mild case of COVID-19, but you can still spread it to others, including those who are immune-compromised, such as cancer patients. That's why we continue to wear masks until we get very widespread immunization." (Published 04/21/2021)
1 video | 24m
Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 vaccine confidence and the importance of that second dose
While the number of people being vaccinated for COVID-19 is dropping, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other medical experts continue to strongly encourage people to get vaccinated for COVID-19. And that means that those who are being vaccinated with the Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine should get their first and second doses on schedule. “About 8% of people who got their first dose have not returned for the second dose and this is concerning when you're getting close to 1 in 10,” says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "When you measure in the short term, one dose in a healthy person offers about 80% protection. But that's not 95% protection like you get after two doses." (Published 04/28/2021)
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