Courses for Canada Compliance Training

  • 6 Courses | 3h 40m 59s
 
Canada Compliance courses cover risk areas such as Preventing Harassment and Violence in the Canadian Workplace, Canadian Anti-Spam Act, Promoting a Substance-free Workplace (Canada), and more. Explore our courses and unleash your edge.

COURSES INCLUDED

Compliance Course

AODA: Customer Service and Accessibility Standard - Ontario
The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act 2005 (the AODA) is a comprehensive law designed to make Ontario completely accessible to persons with disabilities by the year 2025. The provincial government has developed a regulation under the AODA called the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation. Within this regulation are five Accessibility Standards each of which is targeted at removing barriers for persons with disabilities in key areas of daily living. This course covers the Customer Service Standard, the purpose of which is to make the goods, services and facilities provided by businesses and organizations in Ontario accessible to persons with disabilities. This course covers the purpose of the AODA and the requirements of the Customer Service Standard; how to interact and communicate with people with various types of disabilities including those who use assistive devices, service animals, guide dogs, or support people; how to use equipment or devices in order to help those with disabilities access your organization's goods, services, and facilities; instruction on what to do if customers are having difficulty accessing your organization's goods, services, or facilities; and instruction on how to approach your organization's policies governing the provision of goods, services, and facilities to people with disabilities. The information contained in these training materials is provided for general information purposes only and does not constitute legal or other professional advice. Participating in this training program or reading these training materials does not create a lawyer-client relationship with Sherrard Kuzz LLP or with any other legal provider. Participants/readers are advised to seek specific legal advice from members of Sherrard Kuzz LLP (or alternate legal counsel) in relation to any decision or course of action contemplated.
5 topics | 1h has Assessment Up to 30 Languages

Compliance Course

AODA: Integrated Accessibility Standards - Ontario
Created to provide a high-level awareness of an organization's obligations under the AODA's Integrated Accessibility Standards, this course includes instruction on and practical examples of the general requirements of the Integrated Accessibility Standards, and its Employment Standard and Information & Communications Standards. This is a companion course to the previously developed Skillsoft course on the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service, which is another set of standards found in the Integrated Accessibility Standards, and is intended for private sector and not-for-profit employers in Ontario with 50 or more employees. This course does not cover the AODA Transportation or Design of Public Spaces standards. The information contained in these training materials is provided for general information purposes only and does not constitute legal or other professional advice. Participating in this training program or reading these training materials does not create a lawyer-client relationship with Sherrard Kuzz LLP or with any other legal provider. Participants/readers are advised to seek specific legal advice from members of Sherrard Kuzz LLP (or alternate legal counsel) in relation to any decision or course of action contemplated.
3 topics | 1h has Assessment Up to 30 Languages

Compliance Course

Canadian Anti-Spam Act
On July 1, 2014 Canada's anti-spam legislation (CASL) came into effect. If your business or organization uses electronic channels to promote or market itself, its products or services, CASL may affect how you do business. Three government agencies are responsible for enforcing CASL, but the primary enforcement responsibility belongs to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). The CRTC investigates activities that may be in violation of CASL, and if violations are found the CRTC can set administrative monetary penalties for the violation. This course focuses on the provisions of CASL that apply to businesses and organizations and the employees who participate in the commercial activities CASL is designed to regulate. This course was developed with subject matter support provided by Borden Ladner Gervais LLP. Please note, however, that the course materials and content are for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice, a complete statement of the law or an opinion on any subject and may or may not reflect the most current legal developments. No one should act upon the course materials and content or refrain from acting without a thorough examination of the law after the facts of a specific situation are considered. Nothing herein, or in the course materials, shall be construed as professional advice as to any particular situation or constitute a legal opinion with respect to compliance with legal statutes or statutory instruments. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. Readers should not act upon this information without seeking independent legal advice.
3 topics | 30m Up to 30 Languages

Compliance Course

Canadian Antitrust
Canadian companies and their employees operate under the country's Competition Act, an antitrust law intended to maintain and encourage competition in Canada. Violating the Competition Act's pricing and distribution provisions can leave responsible individuals and their companies open to significant civil liabilities and criminal penalties. This course will help you recognise the business benefits of the Competition Act and the practices covered under it. It will also help you recognise and avoid illegal and improper anticompetitive behaviours, and employ pricing techniques that do not violate the Act. This course was developed with subject matter support provided by Borden Ladner Gervais LLP. |w Please note, however, that the course materials and content are for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice, a complete statement of the law or an opinion on any subject, and may or may not reflect the most current legal developments. No one should act upon the course materials and content or refrain from acting without a thorough examination of the law after the facts of a specific situation are considered. Nothing herein, or in the course materials, shall be construed as professional advice as to any particular situation or constitute a legal opinion with respect to compliance with legal statutes or statutory instruments. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. Readers should not act upon this information without seeking independent legal advice.
2 topics | 30m Up to 30 Languages

Compliance Course

Preventing Harassment and Violence in the Canadian Workplace
In recent years, high profile incidents of workplace harassment and violence have heightened employee and employer concerns about safety in the workplace. While the incidents you hear about are often extreme, harassment and violence could happen in the workplace any time. The way a company deals with even the most seemingly trivial incident can make the difference between another day at the office, and front page news. This course will explore the forms harassment can take in the workplace and will also examine the factors that contribute to violence at work. The key to preventing harassment and violence in the workplace is for all employees to be aware of the warning signs and to become familiar with their companies' policies and procedures that address these issues. This course is designed for use in all provinces as a component of an organization's anti-harassment and anti-violence training program, such as is required under Ontario's Bill 168 and Bill 132 and, for companies under federal jurisdiction, Canada’s Bill C-65. Each organization that utilizes this training is responsible for determining whether this training should be supplemented with additional training in order to meet applicable provincial and federal standards on workplace violence and harassment prevention.
6 topics | 21m Up to 30 Languages

Compliance Course

Promoting a Substance-free Workplace (Canada)
Substance abuse is a pervasive problem in society, so it's no surprise that it carries over into the workplace. Substance abusers are more likely to be late or absent from work, change jobs frequently, be less productive, and be involved in workplace accidents. They also tend to have other personal problems outside of work as a result of the substance abuse, which further impairs their ability to concentrate on their work. Successful substance-free workplace programs can result in decreased absenteeism, fewer accidents, less downtime, reduced turnover, and fewer incidents of theft, as well as improving morale and productivity for all employees. This course is designed to provide employees and supervisors with an understanding of the benefits of a substance-free work environment, to help them understand the impact substances have in the workplace and recognize signs of employee substance abuse. This course was developed with subject matter support provided by the Labor & Employment Law Group of the law firm of Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC. Please note, however, that the course materials and content are for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. Nothing herein, or in the course materials, shall be construed as professional advice as to any particular situation or constitute a legal opinion with respect to compliance with any federal, state, or local laws. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. Readers should not act upon this information without seeking professional counsel. The information contained herein is provided only as general information that may or may not reflect the most current legal developments. This information is not provided in the course of an attorney-client relationship and is not intended to constitute legal advice or to substitute for obtaining legal advice from an attorney licensed in your state.
3 topics | 19m Up to 30 Languages
SHOW 3 MORE COURSES
FREE ACCESS