Final Exam: Software Product Owner

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Final Exam: Software Product Owner will test your knowledge and application of the topics presented throughout the Software Product Owner track of the Skillsoft Aspire Software Project Lead to Advanced Scrum Master Journey.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

  • compare Product Backlog prioritization to ordering and why ordering is preferred
    compare the steps, methodologies, and best practices used to perform TDD tests
    define key Scrum events and the role of the product owner for each event
    define techniques for measuring value such as bubble sort, planning poker, break even analysis, cost of delay, ROI and NPV
    define the Pareto principle and how it can be applied to ordering the Product Backlog
    define the roles and responsibilities of the Product Owner
    define what a product is in the Scrum framework and differentiate this against a project
    describe how the Product Owner defines Value for the Scrum process and their interactions with team members
    describe how to generate product ideas through Affinity Grouping, dot voting, and fist of five methods
    describe the collective ownership of the Product by the Product owner and the Scrum Team
    describe the importance of providing transparency on goals and progress during product development
    describe the inherent value of the Product Backlog and how to maximize this value
    describe the purpose of the Product Backlog and how it is derived from the product vision and how the scrum team uses it
    discover best practices for becoming an effective Product Owner
    discover best practices for collaborating with the Scrum Master
    discover best practices for collaborating with the Scrum Team
    discover effective practices for effectively communicating the product backlog to stakeholders
    discover empathy maps to better understand customers
    discover guidelines and best practices used to conduct effective Sprint Reviews
    discover how customer research provides valuable input for defining the product
    discover how different groups of stakeholders have different requirements for the product
    discover how to define the purpose of a product in Scrum
    discover how to generate product ideas through the use of open‐ended questions
    discover other approaches for refining product backlogs such as 80/20, YAGNI, and smaller backlogs
    discover Release Burn-up charts used in product development and how they can be used to provide effective progress tracking
    discover strategies for Incremental Delivery such as Multi Sprint Releases and Prioritized Product Roadmap
    discover the Minimum Viable Product method and how it can be used to refine the product backlog
    discover the Scrum meaning of business value and define guidelines for delivering value
    discover tools and methods commonly used to validate assumptions during the product development process
    examine the purpose of a Minimal Viable Product and how it's used to test assumptions during product planning
  • examine well-known case studies of successful implementation of Minimal Viable Product
    explain the ordering techniques of Kano Attributes and MoSCow and compare the two techniques
    explore assumptions and hypotheses and how they're used in Lean product development to discard the irrelevant and determine the best actions to undertake
    explore preferred methods for fine-tuning product backlogs
    explore the Sprint Review as an method for collecting feedback and making better product decisions
    explore the steps used to plan a Minimal Viable Product
    identify collaborative ordering techniques and when and how they can be used to reach a consensus on ordering the Product Backlog as well as prioritization considerations
    identify common category types of product backlog items (PBIs) and which ones are customer-facing
    identify how value is perceived by various stakeholders and methods for defining a collectively agreed on meaning of value
    identify the guidelines used to adopt Refactoring
    identify the purpose of a Minimal Viable Product and how it's used to test assumptions during product planning
    identify the steps, methodologies, and best practices used to perform TDD tests
    identify why it is important to order or prioritize the product backlog and commonly used ordering techniques
    recall how the Product Owner defines Value for the Scrum process and their interactions with team members
    recognize product discovery techniques to deliver successful products
    recognize Test-Driven Development or TDD and the guidelines for adopting TDD
    recognize the guidelines to be adopted for Release Planning
    recognize the guidelines used to adopt Continuous Integration
    recognize the guidelines used to adopt Refactoring
    recognize the impact of external influences on the product strategy
    recognize the importance and purpose of testing assumptions during product development
    recognize the importance of an effective product strategy in Scrum
    recognize the role and purpose of Continuous Integration, Continuous Delivery, and Continuous Deployment in Scrum
    recognize the role of Product Owner and team members in managing and adding to the product backlog
    recognize the role of the Scrum Master, Product Owner, and Scrum Team in creating the product design
    recognize the steps involved in creating effective user stories
    recognize tips and best practices used to create product backlogs
    recognize user stories as a powerful tool to gather and document user requirements
    understand how the Scrum framework provides for effective product development
    understand the difference between product outcome and output and what is more important for Scrum

IN THIS COURSE

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    Software Product Owner
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